HONEY BEE SWARMS


IMPORTANT
PLEASE ONLY USE THIS BUTTON
TO REPORT HONEY BEE SWARMS. OUR SWARM CATCHERS DO NOT REMOVE WASPS OR HORNETS

Is it a Honey Bee Swarm?

Honey bee swarms may contain several hundred to several thousand worker bees, and one queen. Swarming bees leave their hive and then cluster on a tree limb, shrub or other object (see photo). Clusters usually remain stationary for an hour to a few days, depending on weather and the time needed to find a new site. When a suitable location is found, the cluster breaks up and flies to it.

Honey bee swarms are generally docile and harmless if not disturbed.  Swarms occur in late spring and summer. A swarm is a dense cloud of flying bees which eventually settles in a tree or bush, then forms a tight cluster to stay warm and protect their queen.  They are in search of a new home after having left their old, overcrowded home.

Mt. Baker Beekeepers Association Swarm Catchers

Mt. Baker Beekeepers Association offers as a public service free of charge, qualified club members who are available to retrieve honeybee swarms from many Whatcom County areas. The sooner you contact us after sighting a swarm, the better the odds of capturing it.

Beekeepers may decline to capture a swarm if it’s in a dangerous location or inside the wall or roof of a building or are other types of bees, wasps or hornets.

Mt. Baker Beekeepers Association Swarm Catchers

Mt. Baker Beekeepers Association offers as a public service free of charge, qualified club members who are available to retrieve honeybee swarms from many Whatcom County areas. The sooner you contact us after sighting a swarm, the better the odds of capturing it.

How Mt. Baker Beekeepers Association can help with Swarms

“REPORT A SWARM” contact form. Using this quick contact form, we alert our Swarm Catchers immediately and they WILL call you to obtain further information.

“SWARM CATCHER” list. Here we have a provided the community with a list of local experienced Swarm Catchers. Helpful things to know before you call one of our MBBA Honey Bee Swarm Catchers;

How long have the bees been there?
Is the swarm on public or private property?
Location of the swarm?
What color are the bees?

Mt. Baker Beekeepers Honey Bee SWARM CATCHER List

NAMEPHONE # AREA SERVEDCUT-OUTS?
Arnold Allen
509-844-8233N. Whatcom CountyNo
Miguel Boriss360-483-7892Bellingham + 5 miles outsideNo
Patri Armstrong Crellin360-420-9245Everson, Nooksack and North Whatcom CountyNo
Russell Deptuch
360-815-3989Whatcom CountyNo
Mollie and Greg GandyGreg; 360-393-6390
Mollie; 360-746-9813
Ferndale, possibly Custer, Birch Bay, Blaine, North Bellingham & Lummi Island No
Daryl Hill
360-319-6099Whatcom CountyNo
Teddy McFall
956-533-0628Custer, Ferndale, LyndenNo
Nick Molenda
Nick 360-920-6478
Lucy 360-961-5738
Everson, NooksackNo
Marisa Papetti
360-224-2387 (call or text)Whatcom County No
Jim Trowbridge360-220-1435Whatcom County South of Smith Rd.No
Jon Moore360-647-8839Everson AreaNo
Christopher Kazimer360-393-1338 or
360-592-2269
Whatcom CountyYes
Dakota Stranick360-328-1375Whatcom County, West of DemingNo
Les Scott360-303-0396Bellingham, Whatcom CountyCALL for structure removal only

HoneyBee Swarm Information 

The sooner you call after sighting a swarm, the better the odds of capturing it. Leave the swarm for a beekeeper to deal with, or just leave it undisturbed and it will usually leave in a day or two.

Beekeepers will first ask a few questions to determine if the swarm consists of Honeybees.  Honeybees are golden with black stripes.  Wasps are bright yellow.